Art & Culture

 

An Art Revolution: T.C. Cannon Shows Native Life at The Edge Of America

Tom
Klawsuc
Submitted by master on Tue, 03/12/2019 - 13:00
During his brief career, this Caddo and Kiowa painter, poet and musician blazed a new path for American Indian art and captured the energy and conflict of the 1960s and 1970s. His influence on Indigenous art is finally gaining recognition in an illuminating travelling exhibit now showing at the Museum in New York from April 6 through Sept. 16, 2019.

A Place for the Taken: The REDress Project Gives a Voice to Missing Indigenous Women

Tom
Klawsuc
Submitted by master on Tue, 03/12/2019 - 12:00
The REDress Project of Métis artist Jaime Black speaks for the hundreds, possibly thousands, of Indigenous women and girls who have been murdered or disappeared during the past four decades. The red dresses fluttering at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., and elsewhere are an eerie reminder of a prevalent violence.

Saving an Ancient Craft: Porfirio Gutierrez Returns Home

Tom
Klawsuc
Submitted by master on Tue, 03/12/2019 - 08:00
When Porfirio Gutierrez returned to his home village near Oaxaca, he found his family and other local Zapotec weavers struggling to maintain their traditional techniques and still address the demands from external markets. Using the financial experience he gained from two decades in the United States, he is helping them adapt and preserve the old ways.

Storytelling on Film: Convening an Industry

Tom
Klawsuc
Submitted by master on Wed, 12/20/2017 - 10:46
During the wave of 1970s activism that produced the occupations of Alcatraz, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Wounded Knee, Indigenous people learned the power of media to convey their message to the world. The first Native film festivals emerged to present nascent Native moviemaking. From a start in San Francisco in 1975, these conclaves have burgeoned into major forums allowing Native peoples to tell their own stories in their own voices.