Fall 2018

Abuelas, Ancestors and Atabey: The Spirit of Taíno Resurgence

Tom
Klawsuc
Submitted by master on Thu, 08/16/2018 - 16:10
Speaking through Taíno spiritual leaders in trances, Puerto Rico’s ancestors repeatedly warned before last year’s devastating hurricanes to take care, algo viene, something is coming. These spiritual phenomena are an important strand of the Taíno resurgence, as descendants of the supposedly extinct Caribbean Indigenous peoples recover from the hurricane of European colonialism. This important movement is the focus of a new exhibit Taíno: Native Heritage and Identity in the Caribbean at the George Gustav Heye Center of the National Museum of the American Indian – Smithsonian in lower Manhattan.

On the Western Front: Two Iroquois Nurses in World War I

Tom
Klawsuc
Submitted by master on Thu, 08/16/2018 - 14:38
In spite of racial barriers, Indigenous women served with U.S. and Canadian forces in the horrors of the Great War as nurses in military hospitals near the front. Here is the story of two veterans of the Nurse Corps of the Army Medical Department in France during 1918, Cora Elm (Wisconsin Oneida) and Edith Anderson (Grand River Mohawk).

Fall 2018

Tom
Klawsuc
Submitted by master on Thu, 08/16/2018 - 13:20
As we mark the centenary of the end of The Great War, World War I, our cover most appropriately features the selected design for the National Native American Veterans Memorial, scheduled for ground-breaking in September 2019 and dedication in late 2020. World War I was the first major conflict after the end of the Indian Wars in which American Indians enlisted in a higher proportion than any other ethnic group to serve in the U.S. military. This tradition continues to this day. In this issue we also tell the story of two Native women who overcame racial barriers to serve as nurses with the American Expeditionary Force in France.